The Most Comfortable Night’s Sleep Money Can Buy In Singapore

Ever wondered what it would be like to be a president or a princess, a sultan or a king? While it’s unlikely most of us will reach these stations in life, that doesn’t mean we can’t live like a king or a queen – at least for a few nights.

Luxury hotels are designed to cater to their guests’ every whim, creating a space that is both lavishly opulent and endlessly comfortable. Whether offering butler service or massages on your private balcony, these testaments to exclusivity provide everything you could possibly want, day and night.

If you happen to be travelling to Singapore, and are searching for an exquisitely comfortable night’s rest, look no further. For anyone in need of some inspiration, this is what it’s like to stay in one of the finest luxury hotels in Singapore.

A Sense of Refinement

Looking out onto the dazzling Marina Bay waterfront, The Fullerton Bay Hotel enjoys prime positioning within Singapore’s vibrant heritage precinct. Paying heed to the elegance and culture of yesteryear, this is a hotel that embodies sophisticated refinement.

Honoured with a position within the top one per cent of hotels in Singapore by TripAdvisor Travellers’ Choice Awards 2017, The Fullerton Bay Hotel combines personalised service and exquisite facilities within a magnificent setting.

And what about that view? With its enviable waterfront location, this charming hotel provides perfectly picturesque views over Marina Bay from many of its rooms and suites, but perhaps none more so than the Presidential Suite.

Luxuriate the Senses

Guests staying in the luxurious Presidential Suite can enjoy a panoramic view of the Marina Bay waterfront and city skyline from both the expansive floor-to-ceiling windows in every room, and from the privacy of the suite’s exclusive balcony.

Imagine looking out onto the shimmering water at sunset, watching as reds, pinks and oranges soar across the sky. Observe as one-by-one, lights within Singapore’s towering buildings illuminate the cityscape – all from the tranquil retreat that is the Presidential Suite.

Sprawling across 152 square metres, the suite is spacious and perfectly laid out. Lavishly appointed, it is decked out in opulent golden acer, with rosewood wall panels, creamy marble and perfectly positioned embellishments of tasteful artworks.

Guests can relax in the generous living and dining area, unwind in the lounge and game room, or get some work done in the study. Come night time, they can shut out the world within the tranquil bedroom, sink into bed to luxuriate in Egyptian cotton quality linen, enfolded in a glorious goose down duvet and pillows.

There is just so much to love about living as a king or queen – or indeed, as a president. From helpful services such as express checkout and a shoe shine service, to customised Bottega Veneta collection room amenities and complimentary IDD calls to 15 selected countries, these are the little things that make a stay in the Presidential Suite an exceptional experience.

But really, whether staying in the opulent Presidential Suite, or any of the other beautifully appointed hotel suites and rooms, each stay at The Fullerton Bay Hotel is bound to be more than a little special.

Your Guide To ‘The Nowruz Festival’ in Iran

For over 3,000 years, the Iranian people have been celebrating a festival called Nowruz which is their New Year. The festival takes place each year between March 20th-23rd and signifies the first day of the Spring and the rebirth of nature. The Persian and Iranian New Year is one of the biggest celebrations of all the Persian festivals and is made up of various different customs as part of the overall celebrations. Let’s take a look at the past and the present of this incredible festival. The word Nowruz quite literally means new year and this is how the celebrations go down.

The Origins

For thousands and thousands of years, this time in the calendar has long been a celebration for many different religions and peoples, from the Zoroastars the Babylonians and to the Proto-Indo-Iranians as a celebration of the end of the winter. The vernal equinox signifies the beginning of the spring in the Northern Hemisphere, the rebirth of nature and the time when crops can once again be sewn. This is a celebration that is enjoyed by many different people’s and religions to this day but the largest by far is by the Iranian people by way of Nowruz.

Celebrations

There are many different parts of the overall celebrations and we are going to take a look into a few of the ways in which the people enjoy the festival.

Haft Sin

Some days before the New Year, a special cover called the cloth of seven dishes is placed on the Persian carpet or table in the household. The number 7 is sacred in Persian tradition and seven dishes are placed on the cloth to represent the seven angelic heralds of the life-rebirth. Sprouts, Samanu pudding, Apple (Seeb), Senjed (fruit from the locust tree,) Garlic (Seer,) Somaq berries and vinegar (Serkeh) are all laid out n the table. Other items can be placed on the table which represent hopes for the future, these range from coins for wealth, eggs for fertility, a mirror for reflection and sometimes an orange floating in a bowl of water to represent the Earth in space.

Chaharshanbe Souri

The actual beginnings of the celebration are on the eve of the final Wednesday of the year. Many bonfires are made and family members will jumping over the bonfire and chant “Give me your redness and take away my wintry sallow complexionˮ. When the fires go out, the ashes are collected and planted in the fields to represent the burial of the previous year.

Haji Firuz

The heralding of the New Year is this character who signifies a fire-keeper, a man from the village will dress up in a red get-up complete with black face and red hat. People will gather around Haji Firuz and chant, sing and play the tambourine to celebrate the New Year.

Sizdah Bedar

This occurs on the 13th day of the year and sees families take to the great outdoors to celebrate nature. They will take picnics and enjoy games in the fields. The sprouts (sabzeh) which have been kept on the tables or in the homes will be thrown into the fields to rid bad luck form the house and to make the nature greener.

And that is the celebrations of the Iranian New Year or Nowruz.