3 things you might have not known about fishing in the U.S.

Recreational fishing has become an economic powerhouse over the past several years, and and the stats show it clearly. Back in 2011, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation showed that there were more than forty-six million licensed anglers in the United States.

All of these fishermen and women generate around fifty billion in retail sales, so fishing has become quite the industry. While some might argue that the rise of big brands might not be so good in the long run, the fact of the matter is that most of the companies that deal with manufacturing tackle and gear destined for fishing have created about nine hundred thousand job openings in the past couple of years.

From fishing carts to actual rods and reels, these brands know that anglers like a bit of variety, and that’s why they do their best when it comes to designing products that are user-friendly, portable, and above all, reasonably priced so as to fit the bill.

Here are 3 things you might not have known about fishing in the United States.

  1. It’s one of the most popular outdoor activities in the country

About 18% of all Americans engage in fishing at some point or the other, and believe it or not, most of them go angling alone. At the time this article was written, there were over 49.5 million anglers in the country. While the majority of these people go on four to eleven fishing trips per year, there are older generations who go fishing on more than 100 days in a year.

Part of the reasons that make fishing one of the most attractive pastimes especially for people who are retired is that they get to spend time in nature and escape the demands of everyday life. On average, an American fisherman or woman spends about forty dollars on equipment, so the actual financial effort per capita isn’t shocking. Considering that over twenty-eight million Americans are fishing license holders, it’s no surprise that the cross cost of them went above 680 million dollars in 2015.

  1. Every state has different regulations

If you are an American, you can probably skip this part. If you’re from any other part of the world, however, and would like to go on a fishing trip while you’re spending time in the United States, you need some guidance with regard to getting permits for the type of angling you will engage in.

Regulations differ largely from one state to the next, with some allowing people over the age of 65 and under the age of 15 to receive free licenses or have none. Others are a bit more strict in this sense, so the minimum age ranges from 16 to 18, and to qualify for a free license, you need to be at least 80-years-old.

Some species are protected by the law, so you are not allowed to fish them, not even for catch and release. Every place has limitations regarding the maximum number of fish you can catch and take with you and they vary from species to species. There are some species where this limit does not exist, so you’re free to fish as many as you like.

Loitering and throwing parts of fish in the water is usually against the law regardless of the state you will be angling in. You are not allowed to fish on private property unless it is your own. If there are rivers, streams, or lakes on your property, you need to make sure that they do not belong to the government because if they do, you’ll need a license to fish in those waters.

  1. About 25% of all anglers are female

There used to be this misconception according to which women didn’t enjoy fishing for a variety of reasons. It’s safe to say that some women still don’t like the sport, but things have changed a lot over the years.

The variety of equipment, clothing, and gear manufactured in recent years was also developed and improved in such a way so as to speak to the needs of both male and female users. The sport has become so popular with the gender that in 2012 it was a woman who won the Angler of the Year honors in a professional bass or walleye circuit.

How I Improved My Tennis

I have loved tennis ever since I can remember, my buddy Chase Rubin and I used to play all of the time as kids and as soon as I could, I joined a club. My family didn’t have a great deal of money growing up so I never really had the opportunity to get any coaching. I never wanted to be a professional tennis player, it was always a hobby to me and throughout my teens, for one reason or another, I stopped playing altogether.

Fast forward to two years ago and at the age of 28 I wanted to start playing tennis again, after picking up the racket for the first time in years I realized that my ability had waned somewhat. Because of this, I set about improving my tennis skills and last week I won my very first tournament, here is how I improved my skills.

Check Your Grip

There is more than one way to grip a tennis racket and this is the first place that I started, I was still using the grip that I used as a child and once I changed it on my backhand side, things improved greatly. I had still been using two hands to play backhand, something I did in my youth to give me extra power but now something that was inhibiting me, I changed to a single handed backhand and the results were remarkable.

Game Time

I joined the local club and tried to meet as many people as possible so that I could get a lot of game time in. In something of a ballsy move, I decided to play as many games as I could against far better players than me. Whilst I imagine it probably was frustrating for those who I was playing against, it helped me up my game in no time at all.

Playing Doubles

I started playing a lot more doubles matches once I joined the club and this too helped me to add different parts to my game. The thing with doubles is that you need to be far more aware of what is going on as you are not only playing against your opponent, you must also learn to play alongside your partner. The club had an open night each Wednesday and doubles would normally be played because of the limited courts that they had. Regarding my volleying and lobbing ability, doubles really helped me to improve.

Wall Practice

You cannot play against someone all of the time and so I used to practice against the wall of my house, much to my wife’s discontent. I have quite a bit of space in my back yard and I was able to practice short volleys as well as forehand and backhand combinations from distance. I actually painted a line on the wall which was the same height as the net on the court and I really felt the benefit from these practice sessions.