Should I Buy A Retirement or Holiday Home In Costa Blanca?

Did you know that Spain is home to the highest number of British citizens living abroad in mainland Europe – with approximately 300,000 registered in the country. Retiring overseas, for British citizens, can seem like a dream come true – and Spain is perhaps the perfect retiree or even holiday home getaway destination.

Spain, as a retirement or holiday home location, is popular for a range of reasons. First and foremost, this popularity surrounds British retirees enjoying Spain’s major coastal resorts – like Costa Blanca or the Costa Del Sol. The climate, the ecology and wider cultural experience provides retirees with a cost-effective, accessible, and value-led retirement experience.

Why Costa Blanca?

The Costa Blanca – which in Spanish means “White Coast” – is a 120 mile stretch of Mediterranean coastline in the heart of the Alicante provide in Spain. There are numerous towns and villages from Pilar de la Horadada to Javea. There are over four million people who call the Costa Blanca home – a melting pot of cultures and different nationalities. The region is serviced by great transport links with major hubs – like international airports and major train stations. The area also boasts the moniker of “the market garden of Europe,” thanks to its gastronomic creativity which is a credit to the bountiful fish stocks, lush farmland and a superb variety of fruits and vegetables all of which make experiencing the wider array of hospitality services that much more tasty.

Buying Property in The Costa Blanca – What You Need to Know?

You will need to find a real estate agent, like Valuvillas, who can help you find properties in places like Javea or other beautiful Costa Blanca towns and villages. Once you have found your dream property, you will need to work with a Spanish real estate agent and a legal professional to undertake discussions on the terms and conditions relating to the seller agreement for the property. This process is about taking the verbal terms agreed by both parties and cementing them into a contract – which is known as a Contrato de Reserva, a reservation contract, which will be signed by the buyer and the seller at which time you will need to pay a Senal de Reserva, a reservation deposit, which is usually around €4-5,000.

This is followed by the exchange of what is known as Private Purchase Contracts or Contrato Privado de Compraventa. These are private purchasing contracts that provide the biding agreement terms between the buyer and seller – this sets out the date by which the completion occurs and the wider terms and conditions of the sale experience going forward. This is followed by legal searches which are required before ‘completion’. They should have obtained what is called a Nota Simple, a certificate, from the Property Registry in Spain. Once verified, this is when a customary percentage of the purchase price is paid – whether it is a cash purchase or off-plan acquisition. This leads to the formal ‘completion’ of the purchase – a contract is signed, called a Escritura de Compraventa, or sales contract, by both parties, which must be done in the presence of a Notario (a public notary). The notary will forward the registration of the property’s title deeds to warrant the change of ownership.

How Javea-Property Can Help

At Javea-Property, we can help navigate you through this process – we can help you understand nationality eligibility, taxes, and other issues. Furthermore, with friendly staff who have expertise of the Javea and wider area who can help you find your dream home in Spain – whether for retirement or holiday memories. Call us or visit our website today to find out more?

Brexit Effects on Buying a Spanish Property

Before, purchasing a property in Spain was a straightforward seamless process for UK citizens. However, since the Brexit referendum, things have changed. It’s therefore essential that buyers assess the impact of this referendum before buying as the process can be more complicated.

Brexit and International Property

The Association of International Property Association (AIPP) predicts a huge impact on the international property sector following Brexit. It is why they want certainty that British owner’s rights of a foreign property will be considered and included during Brexit negotiations. Without this, purchasing a house in Spain will be a painful investment. That said let’s look at how Brexit will affect buying of properties for UK nationals.

Will Brexit Hinder One from Buying a Second House in Spain?

Although in the short term, changes in currency due to Brexit have made it hard for buyers to afford to buy a house in popular locations. As a result, purchasing second-holiday homes seems difficult compared to buying retirement homes. Studies found that currency volatility impact sales negatively.

Before the global financial crisis in 2008, the exchange rate of pound-euro was profitable. A UK pound at times could be as high as 1.56 euros. However, as of May 1st, 2020, it trades at 1.15 euros. There have been significant fluctuations for exchange rates of GBP-EUR after Brexit, but now, the Covid-19 pandemic is worsening things.

Many individuals thinking of buying a property in Spain might be put off with the low currency exchange rates. But, non-EU nationals like Americans and Scandinavians can continue buying property as they have always done without any problems even during low exchange rates.

Brexit Influence on the Overall International Real Estate Cost

Since there are some limitations of movement, it can cause some restrictions or visa requirements. But, because British citizens with property on Spain contribute to this country’s economy, they will not be denied entry visas to visit their houses.

Will More UK Citizens Emigrate Due to Brexit?

Well, recent research says that there has been an increase in online searches on the number of UK nationals who want to migrate to countries like Canada, Australia, and New Zealand following Brexit. While often the reasons for migrating are personal, the fact that Britain is out of the EU will encourage some people to move to different countries. However, this will be mostly an incentive for those who had been thinking about moving anyway.

Brexit Impact on Passports, Visas, Currency, and Migration

Brexit will likely cause many and significant political changes considering that the UK opted for a system of immigration points like that in Australia. There will be limited movements between UK and EU from January 2021. Additionally, while it is still not clear on how Britain’s immigration point system will work, it’ll likely result in an exit from the single market.

Note that, the UK and EU had a scheme that gave British nationals the freedom to live, start businesses or study in any European country they have migrated to. However, Brexit does not include freedom of movement which means things could also change for British citizens in terms of social security benefits, accessing health care, and working rights. As a result, it also reduces the number of Brits who want to work or buy a property abroad.

How Will Brexit Impact International Property Owners

Well, it’s not exactly clear how this referendum will affect those who own international properties. However, it would be impractical to limit cash flow from British expats. Think about it. Over 1.2 million British expats are living in France, Spain, and Ireland. And more than 1 million UK residents own a property in the EU and visit regularly for holidays. Therefore, it wouldn’t be wise to limit these over 2.2 million people from spending their cash in EU countries.

Brexit Influence on Exchange Rates

We’ve already said that the low exchange rates have already negatively affected some perceptions about buying a property abroad or migrating to these countries. But, according to a recent survey, there has been an increased demand for currency exchange services since Brexit. This demand is mostly from British businesses who want to balance market shifts and protect their investments by controlling their currency risk.

Final Thoughts

Well, as we have earlier said Brexit will have a huge impact on buying or living abroad for UK nationals. It is therefore wise that you weigh out the effects before making any decision. Also, experts urge buyers to work with a real estate agent, an attorney, and financial experts when buying a Spanish property.

Your Guide To ‘La Tomatina’ in Buñol, Spain

If you want to a go to one of the World’s messiest festivals then why not learn some Spanish and visit Spain this year and go to a festival where you can spend the day throwing rotten tomatoes at people. Wait, what, Tomatoes? That’s right people, a festival exists in the World where you essentially spend your day, launching piles and and piles of tomatoes at each other in the street before being hosed down by the local fire service. Ladies and Gentlemen, we bring you, La Tomatina, and here is your guide to this crazy Spanish festival.

The Origins of the Festival

The festival takes place in Buñol, Valencia and has done since around 1944, its origins are unclear but the general thought is that it began when the townspeople became frustrated at the city councillors and rioted by throwing tomatoes at them to display their discontent. The years that followed saw the beginnings of the festival until it was banned in the lat 50s as a result of having no religious significance. After a swell of public support, the festival was reinstated in 1970 where it became an official festival and had rules imposed. the key year for the festival was 1975 where the introduction of tomato throwing became a key part of the festival and that has continued up until the modern day.

The Festival

The amount of participants that join the festival each year has risen to around 40,000 as of 2016. The festival is held on the last Wednesday of August during the week-long festivities of Buñol and the tomatoes arrive in trucks from local growers.

The Fight

The tomato fight lasts for around one hour, the beginning of the fight is signified in a strange way but one that is much in line with the festival. At 9am there is a large, greasy pole with a ham tied to the end of it, people scramble to reach the ham and once someone has grabbed it, the fight begins. The rucks will tip around 130 tonnes of ripe tomatoes on to the waiting crowd and madness ensues. The hour-long fight culminates in the sound of a cannon where everyone is left covered in squelchy tomatoes and red from the juice. After the fight, everyone scrambles to find the nearest person with a hose to be cleaned down.

The Rules

Yes, there are rules to this madcap festival and they are as follows:

– You must squish the tomatoes before throwing them in order to avoid injuring people.

– You must not throw anything other than tomatoes during the fight.

– Participants must make way for trucks and lorries coming through.

– After the second cannon is sounded, no tomatoes are allowed to be thrown.

How to Get Involved

As mentioned before, the festival takes place on the last Wednesday or August and in the town of Buñol, Valencia. Participation for the event costs 10 Euros and if you want to be one of those on top of the truck then you will have to pay a whopping 750 Euros.

What better way to spend a Spanish summer day than launching tomatoes at strangers!