Your Guide to the ‘Chinchilla Festival’ in Australia 

If there is any nation on Earth who knows how to party and throw a festival then it’s the Aussies and their offering which we’ve decided to give you a guide to is the Chinchilla Melon Festival.  Never has there been a celebration of the rotund fruit quite the way there is in Chinchilla, Queensland. This festival has been going for some years now and if you want to visit a zany and exciting festival then look no further than the Chinchilla Melon Festival. Let’s see what it is all about.

The Origins

Chinchilla produces around 25% of all of the melons in Australia including Honeydew, Watermelon and Rockmelon varieties. The town began its festivities dedicated towards melons in 1994 after a sever drought left the town unable to grow melons for an entire season. When the drought was over, local businessmen and producers put their heads together and decided that they would have some festivities to celebrate the end of the drought, the result was the Melon Festival.

How Many Visitors

Visitors to the festival have increased steadily in number and after beginning with around 2,500, this figure has risen to more than 10,000 in recent years as popularity of the festival continues to spread.

What Goes On?

The festival is exactly what it says, a festival dedicated to Melons and all of the events that take place are centered around the various different types of melons which are produced. The unique and interactive events involve the following unique and crazy activities:

– Melon skiing

– Melon bungee

– Melon bungee

– Melon Ironman

– Melon chariot

– Melon eating races

– World record attempt melon pip spitting

Everyone can enter into the contests but if you think this is for you then you should be aware, the locals practice their crazy activities all year long in order to become the champion in their chosen discipline.

A super special event in 2009 saw resident John Allwood broke the Guinness World Record for the amount of melons smashed with his head, the impressive Aussie managed a rate of 47 melons per minute.

A Look at the Accolades

In 2009, the same year as Allwood’s Guinness World Record, the Chinchilla Melon Festival won the award for Queensland Regional Achievement and Community Award for Tourism Event.

How You Can Visit

If you want to go to this crazy festival then you are more than welcome, head down to Chinchilla in Queensland on the 19th of February this year. All you is to get yourself some accommodation and then enjoy the festival. In order to take part or watch, you do not need to book tickets, simply pick up a schedule of events and then go crazy with some melons. Make sure that you take your camera though, there is no festival in the World like this one and your friends probably won’t believe you when you tell them just what you saw.

Your Guide To ‘La Tomatina’ in Buñol, Spain

If you want to a go to one of the World’s messiest festivals then why not visit Spain this year and go to a festival where you can spend the day throwing rotten tomatoes at people. Wait, what, Tomatoes? That’s right people, a festival exists in the World where you essentially spend your day, launching piles and and piles of tomatoes at each other in the street before being hosed down by the local fire service. Ladies and Gentlemen, we bring you, La Tomatina, and here is your guide to this crazy Spanish festival.

The Origins of the Festival

The festival takes place in Buñol, Valencia and has done since around 1944, its origins are unclear but the general thought is that it began when the townspeople became frustrated at the city councillors and rioted by throwing tomatoes at them to display their discontent. The years that followed saw the beginnings of the festival until it was banned in the lat 50s as a result of having no religious significance. After a swell of public support, the festival was reinstated in 1970 where it became an official festival and had rules imposed. the key year for the festival was 1975 where the introduction of tomato throwing became a key part of the festival and that has continued up until the modern day.

The Festival

The amount of participants that join the festival each year has risen to around 40,000 as of 2016. The festival is held on the last Wednesday of August during the week-long festivities of Buñol and the tomatoes arrive in trucks from local growers.

The Fight

The tomato fight lasts for around one hour, the beginning of the fight is signified in a strange way but one that is much in line with the festival. At 9am there is a large, greasy pole with a ham tied to the end of it, people scramble to reach the ham and once someone has grabbed it, the fight begins. The rucks will tip around 130 tonnes of ripe tomatoes on to the waiting crowd and madness ensues. The hour-long fight culminates in the sound of a cannon where everyone is left covered in squelchy tomatoes and red from the juice. After the fight, everyone scrambles to find the nearest person with a hose to be cleaned down.

The Rules

Yes, there are rules to this madcap festival and they are as follows:

– You must squish the tomatoes before throwing them in order to avoid injuring people.

– You must not throw anything other than tomatoes during the fight.

– Participants must make way for trucks and lorries coming through.

– After the second cannon is sounded, no tomatoes are allowed to be thrown.

How to Get Involved

As mentioned before, the festival takes place on the last Wednesday or August and in the town of Buñol, Valencia. Participation for the event costs 10 Euros and if you want to be one of those on top of the truck then you will have to pay a whopping 750 Euros.

What better way to spend a Spanish summer day than launching tomatoes at strangers!